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Educator, instructional technologist, tinkerer, musicmaker, hauler of bootstraps

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Grant Potter

Grant Potter

Grant Potter

First Nations community ISP run by teenagers and 20 somethings services 30 homes, and the project is far from finished. https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/mgb8qv/how-first-nations-kids-built-their-own-internet-infrastructure

Grant Potter

Misinformation Research

This is an open article database for information pollution researchers. The purpose of this database is to support community and platform research to fight misinformation online. It is a work in progress.

Grant Potter

http://higheredstrategy.com/canadas-secret-weapon-inequality/ "Broad access, strong community colleges and polytechnics, and a university system where excellence is not confined to a tiny elite. It’s not a complete recipe for success, but it’s a good start, and one we should acknowledge more publicly."

Grant Potter

https://www.newportmesh.net/who-we-are "to provide low-cost, community supported mesh internet access to our primarily low income downtown neighborhood in Vermont's Northeast"

Grant Potter

https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/34623859/2018-01-10-Pricing.Study.pdf?sequence=3 “community-owned FTTH networks tend to provide lower prices for their entry-level broadband service than do private telecommunications companies, and are clearer about and more consistent in what they charge.

Grant Potter

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/12/18/estonia-the-digital-republic “the backbone of Estonia’s digital security is a technology called K.S.I.”

“I asked Kaevats what he saw when he looked at the U.S. Two things, he said. First, a technical mess. Data architecture was too centralized. Citizens didn’t control their own data; it was sold, instead, by brokers. Basic security was lax. “For example, I can tell you my I.D. number—I don’t fucking care,” he said. “You have a Social Security number, which is, like, a big secret.” He laughed. “This does not work!” The U.S. had backward notions of protection, he said, and the result was a bigger problem: a systemic loss of community and trust. “Snowden things and whatnot have done a lot of damage. But they have also proved that these fears are justified.”

Grant Potter

Grant Potter

All I Know Is What’s on the Internet

As much as the advocates of information literacy at libraries and universities hope to be arbiters of truth and facilitators of knowledge, with a unimpeachable mission of social justice guiding their practices, their micro actions over the past few centuries have too often been tangential rather than negotiated with or in resistance to the dominant hierarchy. The result is a system that, by and large, reconciles pupils to the existing order, first in deference to an aristocracy of power and now to the sovereignty of the market.

So rather than develop localized standards, with librarians and instructors working in collaboration with those seeking information, developing together shared social standards for knowledge in their community, colleges and libraries have ceded control to content publishers, who impose their hierarchical understanding of information on passive consumers, leaving institutions to only exhibit and protect the information. In this, they have excelled: Access to the world’s most prestigious research journals is a website away, although that website is behind both a tuition and a journal subscription firewall. The best teachers in the world offer the best courses in the world for free through networks of classes aimed at democratizing education, as long as the students are essentially autodidacts. Although shrewd advertising promotes the college experience as personalized and connective, schools and libraries have joined the historical arbiters of culture as mausoleums.

To remake education into a space of social justice rather than course-by-course “all you can consume” content buffets, faculty and staff would need to acknowledge and address these structural issues. Instead, educators doubled down on control, promulgating top-down information-literacy rubrics.